David Warner Follows The Advise Of Virender Sehwag To Attain Success In Test Cricket

David Warner Follows The Advise Of Virender Sehwag To Attain Success In Test Cricket

On Saturday (30th November), Chris Gayle welcomed David Warner to the 300 clubs after the Australian cricketer’s strike in Adeliade against Pakistan. The left-hand batsman registered his first triple-hundred in the Test cricket. He credited former Indian cricketer Virender Sehwag for guiding him to survive in the longest format.
On the second day of the Test match, the record of Brian Lara of 400 Test runs was in danger. Australian skipper Tim Paine had to declare the innings keeping in mind the weather condition as the unbeaten Warner scored 335* and lead his team to the score of 589 runs (589/3 decl.) in the first innings. With patience, he faced 418 balls without concerning his non-striker end losing the wickets. The visitors had no answer to his batting style.
After a long break, the player made the Test comeback in the Ashes 2019 but didn’t have contributions with the bat for his team. In the home Test series against Pakistan, he showed that he could be dreadful Test batsman. He scored 154 runs in the first Test match of this series and remained unbeaten in the second Test match. This home series can be said as the perfect comeback for Warner.
David Warner revealed the Advise of Virender Sehwag
David Warner
Warner, who has played 81 Test matches, is the best in the shorter formats. The southpaw, with 23 Test centuries in his name, was not confident that he could play big knock in Test cricket but there was one who had faith in Warner. He opined that Virender Sehwag was assured that he can be a better Test player.
He has recalled a chat with Sehwag during IPL and opened that former Indian cricketer’s advice has helped him a lot to gain success in Test cricket.
“When I met Virender Sehwag while playing for Delhi in the IPL, he sat down to me and said I will be a better Test player than a Twenty 20 player. I said ‘you’re out of your mind, I’ve not played many first-class games’,” Warner said.
“He always said ‘they will have slips and gully, covers open, mid-wicket stay there. mid-off and mid-on will be up, you can get off to a flier and sit there all day and you’ll be picking them all off’. That’s always stuck in my mind, it sounded very easy when we were discussing then,” he added.


Thursday January 01, 1970

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